Writing The Outlaws Scarlett and Browne

Author Archives: Samantha Thomas

Writing The Outlaws Scarlett and Browne

Post Image

Guest post by Jonathon Stroud It’s always odd holding a new book in your hands, and looking back at the process by which you came to write it. Very rarely is it a simple, clearly identifiable journey – a broad path curving back neatly to the original idea. More often it resembles an archaeological dig […]

read more

Why I Love Horror

Post Image

Guest post by Amy McCaw Although I think of Mina and the Undead as more of a murder mystery than pure horror, there are horror touches and references throughout the narrative.  A combination of things got me into horror. The first was my dad’s video shop. I spent a lot of time there in the […]

read more

Featherlight

Post Image

Guest Post by Peter Bunzl The spark of inspiration for Featherlight came one day when I was flicking through one of my old notebooks. and a few lines of an unfinished poem caught my eye: ‘I am the lighthouse keeper’s daughter, And I keep the lighthouse by the water. Keep the oil lamps burning bright, […]

read more

Make ‘Em Laugh – or snigger at least The Importance of humour in books by Lindsay J Sedgwick

Post Image

Hairy eyebrows that look like wrestlers in a mudbath. An evil villain who dives under a chair and retrieves a dog toy in her mouth on public television. Kid’s books are meant to be full of humour of one sort of another, be it exaggerated similes that are fun to imagine for a moment, the […]

read more

The Importance of Mental Health in Books for Children

Post Image

Guest post by Joseph Elliott Now – as the pandemic drags on into 2021 and schools shut once again – it’s more important than ever for us to be discussing mental health, including that of children. According to a recent study by the NHS, the number of children experiencing a probable mental health disorder has increased […]

read more

Meet the Oceans

Post Image

Guest post by Caryl Hart Meet the Oceans is a fabulous first look at the wonders of the underwater world for young children. Illustrated by the amazingly talented Bethan Woollvin, it takes readers on an exciting submarine adventure to meet some of our planet’s oceans and seas. Each body of salty water has its own personality […]

read more

Future Girl

Post Image

Guest Post by Asphyxia My book, Future Girl, is the art journal of a Deaf sixteen-year-old, Piper, who lives in near-future Melbourne just as it lurches towards environmental catastrophe. It covers themes that I am extremely passionate about – the high risk we face of environmental disaster, art journaling for self-expression, and Deafness. For a long time I […]

read more

Shining a Torch on Sleep and Screens

Post Image

By Nicola Morgan, whose latest brilliant science-based title is The Awesome Power of Sleep: How Sleep Supercharges Your Teenage Brain. (Other brains are available and all my sleep advice is for anyone!) We keep being told to avoid screens before bed because of the light. But is this true? As it happens, this is another […]

read more

Fighting Fantasy

By Ian Livingstone Fighting Fantasy gamebooks first appeared in the 1980s with the publication of The Warlock of Firetop Mountain, the first branching narrative book with a simple role-playing game system attached – hence the term ‘gamebook’. Usually set in worlds of monsters and magic, Fighting Fantasy gamebooks place the reader at the heart of […]

read more

The Song for Everyone

Guest Post by author Lucy Morris My name is Lucy Morris and I am the writer and illustrator of The Song for Everyone.  Originally I trained as a fine art painter but have always had a love of writing and drawing stories.  After the arrival of my children I had the opportunity to revisit all […]

read more